Tag Archives: funeral

Prince’s Urn – Totally Unique 

princeThis past week, People Magazine revealed the first photos of Prince’s urn, one that is a totally unique as the man was himself.

While alive, Paisley Park in Minnesota was Prince’s home; as of last Thursday, it became a museum and memorial to him.  At that museum, his ashes are on display in a one of a kind urn that was designed by his sister, Tyka Nelson and his nephew President Nelson.  They partnered with Foreverence, a company that developed a scale model of Paisley Park itself.  It’s 14 x 18 inches and decorated with Prince’s famous symbol in his signature purple.

His ashes are sealed in the front column and, though it can’t be seen by the public, the facade “opens to reveal a miniature replica of Paisley Park’s grand atrium, including the singer’s signature purple Yamaha piano, white ornamental doves and decorative tile floor. The interior even includes real working lights.”

According to its website, Foreverence designs urns and memorials that “celebrate life, passion, and legacy”.  They’re “a timeless tribute as unique as the life it represents.” They certainly managed that for Prince.

You may not want such a unique resting place but you may want information about options that are available to you.  To find out more, go to www.diesmart.com.






Seven towns want their residents to become immortal!

cemeteryBet you never thought that there would be places where death is a crime.  Well, there are.  Seven cities in Italy, France, Brazil, Spain and Norway urge their citizens not to die.


  1. Sellia, Italy – The town has only 537 residents, the majority over 65.  The mayor decreed that getting sick was not an option.  If the residents died, it might kill the town as well.  Even though the ban is not enforceable, the town government encourages its residents to stay healthy.  Anyone who doesn’t get a yearly checkup will be fined.
  2.   Cugnaux, France – Because there were only 17 plots left in the town cemeteries, in 2007 the mayor decreed dying illegal for anyone who didn’t already have a crypt to be buried in.  The only available land for a new cemetery was on a nearby military air base.  However, the defense ministry did not want the town to bury its dead there.  Luckily, the defense ministry finally gave in and agreed to allow burials.
  3. Sarpourenx, France – In 2008, because of overcrowded cemetery conditions, the mayor forbid residents from passing on.  “Offender shall be severely punished.”
  4. Biritiba Mirim, Brazil – In 2005, there was such a shortage of space in the local cemetery that the mayor banned death.  Luckily, a new cemetery opened in 2010 so people are allowed to go on dying.
  5. Lanjaron, Spain – In 1999, this town faced a grave shortage.  So the mayor forbid his citizens to die until municipal officials could find space for a new cemetery.
  6. Falciano Del Massico, Italy – In 2012, this town decided to outlaw death as a way of prodding a neighboring town into letting it share cemetery space.  (The neighboring town had been charging non-residents more for a plot.)  As of 2014, the town was still fighting to get a new cemetery.
  7. Longyearbyen, Norway – It’s the world’s northernmost settlement and mostly a mining town.  In 1950, realizing that bodies in the local cemetery were not decomposing, the town stopped allowing new burials.  If you get sick and think you’re going to die, you’d better go elsewhere.

If you know of another town anywhere in the world that doesn’t allow death, we’d love to know about it.

For information about end of life planning, check out our website www.diesmart.com.

10 Tips A Funeral Home Won’t Tell You

adjectivesIn the past, we have written a lot about planning a funeral, the prepayment option and hints to save money. We recently came across a blog from urnsonline.com that we want to share with you. Click here to see what it says. The ideas are excellent ones and convey suggestions that you probably aren’t familiar with. Take a few minutes to read the blog, even if you’re not planning a funeral right now.   The tips will come in handy when you do.

For further information about funeral planning, go to www.diesmart.com.

The Mushroom Death Suit – almost ready for use

Mushroom myceliumWe’ve reported before on unique ways to dispose of someone’s body after death.  However, a friend found a new one that already has people lining up to use it – The Mushroom Death Suit.  The brainstorm of Jae Rhim Lee, it’s a burial suit that contains mushroom spoors.  They will be able to “eat” your body and neutralize its toxins after you’ve been buried.  The suit will prevent toxins in the human body from being released into the environment after death and is also intended to help deliver nutrients to plant roots more quickly and efficiently.

The first real user of this suit will be Dennis White, a 63-year-old man suffering from a neurodegenerative disease.  He hopes that this will make his death a greener process.

The Infinity Burial suit (the other name for this product) is available in pod form for animal burials as well.

Whether the suit will actually work in practice is yet to be seen…but it’s certainly an interesting idea.

For more information about traditional and non-traditional ways to dispose of a body after death, go to www.diesmart.com.


Dinnerware made from your loved one’s ashes!

cremation-designsLast week, I wrote about glass art that can be fused with ashes from a deceased loved one.  This week, I came across something even more bizarre.

Chronicle Cremation Designs has launched a range of custom ceramic dinnerware glazed with the cremated ashes of dead loved ones.  Here’s what it says on their website.

Justin Crowe, based in Santa Fe, New Mexico, mixes cremated human ashes into a glaze which he uses to coat bowls, vases, candle holders, coffee cups, urns and other ceramic items. Once they’ve been fired in a kiln, the glaze becomes food- and drink-safe, which means you could perhaps drink a coffee with an aura of grandma, or use something of old uncle Bernard to serve roast potatoes.

The idea developed out of an art project in which Crowe used the mixed ashes of more than 200 people to create a dinnerware collection called Nourish, and then used it to serve food at a party.

“I wanted to create a dinnerware set that infuses a sense of mortality into everyday life,” he said, explaining that he bought human remains from bone dealers (who typically sell to medical professionals, students and oddity collectors) and then turned them into ash in the kiln before grinding them up with a mortar and pestle. He then mixed the powder into a glaze.

Now, you can send in about a cup of ashes from the remains of your loved one and have it made into an item that you can use every day.

This is definitely something for everyone, but….

For more cremation and funeral ideas, go to our site diesmart.com.