HR3200- Health Care Reform and “Death Panels”

58% of the news in the last 3 days has focused on health care reform.   A lot of discussion has centered on proposed legislation regarding “death panels” and end of life counseling.     How can 10 pages in a bill that is 1017 pages long cause so much fear and rhetoric?

Here’s our insight about these 10 pages..and the Health Care Reform Bill.

#1.   The reality is  dying is different today.  Longevity and medicine are changing how we age and eventually die.   Available research shows that if you reach the age of 65, an average male will die at the age of 82 and a female will die at the age of 85.     Sounds great…everyone wants to live longer.   However, at the same time our population is aging, the way we die is changing.    An Office of Aging study, “The Dilemma of an Aging Society”  classified the elderly into four groups:

The first group will die after a short period of sharp decline, the typical course of death from cancer.  Roughly 20 percent of all deaths are of this type.

  • The second group will die following several years of increasing physical limitations, punctuated by intermittent acute life-threatening episodes, typical course of death from chronic cardiac or respiratory failure.  Roughly 20 percent of all deaths are of this type.
  • The third–and the largest–group will only die after prolonged dwindling, usually lasting many years.  This is the typical course of death from dementia (including Alheimer’s disease) and disabling stroke.  The trajectory towards death is gradual and unrelenting, with steady decline, enfeeblement and growing dependency, often lasting a decade or longer.   Roughly 40 percent of all deaths are projected to be of this type.
  • The other 20 percent will die as a result of some sudden and acute event, like an accident.

#2.  80% of us will need help in managing our affairs as we age.   Sounds simple?   It’s not.  The fact is incapacity, like death, is an event in your life where laws decide who has the authority to manage your affairs for you when you can’t and the choices your agents can make.  These are the laws your family and friends will be required to follow if you become unable to make decisions on your own behalf.   These are the laws creating the need for legal documents called advanced directives:  Living Wills, Health Care Power of Attorney,  Durable Power of Attorney…and others.    Living Wills and Health Care Power of Attorney directives manage our health care affairs.   A Durable Power of Attorney manages our financial affairs.

#3.  A headline on page 424 of the bill is titled “Advance Care Planning Consultation” and discusses these directives.

SEC. 1233. ADVANCE CARE PLANNING CONSULTATION.
(a) Medicare-

(1) IN GENERAL- Section 1861 of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 1395x) is amended–

(A) in subsection (s)(2)–

(i) by striking `and’ at the end of subparagraph (DD);

(ii) by adding `and’ at the end of subparagraph (EE); and

(iii) by adding at the end the following new subparagraph:

`(FF) advance care planning consultation (as defined in subsection (hhh)(1));’; and

(B) by adding at the end the following new subsection:

`Advance Care Planning Consultation
`(hhh)(1) Subject to paragraphs (3) and (4), the term `advance care planning consultation’ means a consultation between the individual and a practitioner described in paragraph (2) regarding advance care planning, if, subject to paragraph (3), the individual involved has not had such a consultation within the last 5 years. Such consultation shall include the following:

`(A) An explanation by the practitioner of advance care planning, including key questions and considerations, important steps, and suggested people to talk to.

`(B) An explanation by the practitioner of advance directives, including living wills and durable powers of attorney, and their uses.

`(C) An explanation by the practitioner of the role and responsibilities of a health care proxy.

`(D) The provision by the practitioner of a list of national and State-specific resources to assist consumers and their families with advance care planning, including the national toll-free hotline, the advance care planning clearinghouses, and State legal service organizations (including those funded through the Older Americans Act of 1965).

`(E) An explanation by the practitioner of the continuum of end-of-life services and supports available, including palliative care and hospice, and benefits for such services and supports that are available under this title.

`(F)(i) Subject to clause (ii), an explanation of orders regarding life sustaining treatment or similar orders, which shall include–

`(I) the reasons why the development of such an order is beneficial to the individual and the individual’s family and the reasons why such an order should be updated periodically as the health of the individual changes;

`(II) the information needed for an individual or legal surrogate to make informed decisions regarding the completion of such an order; and

`(III) the identification of resources that an individual may use to determine the requirements of the State in which such individual resides so that the treatment wishes of that individual will be carried out if the individual is unable to communicate those wishes, including requirements regarding the designation of a surrogate decisionmaker (also known as a health care proxy).

`(ii) The Secretary shall limit the requirement for explanations under clause (i) to consultations furnished in a State–

`(I) in which all legal barriers have been addressed for enabling orders for life sustaining treatment to constitute a set of medical orders respected across all care settings; and

`(II) that has in effect a program for orders for life sustaining treatment described in clause (iii).

`(iii) A program for orders for life sustaining treatment for a States described in this clause is a program that–

`(I) ensures such orders are standardized and uniquely identifiable throughout the State;

`(II) distributes or makes accessible such orders to physicians and other health professionals that (acting within the scope of the professional’s authority under State law) may sign orders for life sustaining treatment;

`(III) provides training for health care professionals across the continuum of care about the goals and use of orders for life sustaining treatment; and

`(IV) is guided by a coalition of stakeholders includes representatives from emergency medical services, emergency department physicians or nurses, state long-term care association, state medical association, state surveyors, agency responsible for senior services, state department of health, state hospital association, home health association, state bar association, and state hospice association.

`(2) A practitioner described in this paragraph is–

`(A) a physician (as defined in subsection (r)(1)); and

`(B) a nurse practitioner or physician’s assistant who has the authority under State law to sign orders for life sustaining treatments.

`(3)(A) An initial preventive physical examination under subsection (WW), including any related discussion during such examination, shall not be considered an advance care planning consultation for purposes of applying the 5-year limitation under paragraph (1).

`(B) An advance care planning consultation with respect to an individual may be conducted more frequently than provided under paragraph (1) if there is a significant change in the health condition of the individual, including diagnosis of a chronic, progressive, life-limiting disease, a life-threatening or terminal diagnosis or life-threatening injury, or upon admission to a skilled nursing facility, a long-term care facility (as defined by the Secretary), or a hospice program.

`(4) A consultation under this subsection may include the formulation of an order regarding life sustaining treatment or a similar order.

`(5)(A) For purposes of this section, the term `order regarding life sustaining treatment’ means, with respect to an individual, an actionable medical order relating to the treatment of that individual that–

`(i) is signed and dated by a physician (as defined in subsection (r)(1)) or another health care professional (as specified by the Secretary and who is acting within the scope of the professional’s authority under State law in signing such an order, including a nurse practitioner or physician assistant) and is in a form that permits it to stay with the individual and be followed by health care professionals and providers across the continuum of care;

`(ii) effectively communicates the individual’s preferences regarding life sustaining treatment, including an indication of the treatment and care desired by the individual;

`(iii) is uniquely identifiable and standardized within a given locality, region, or State (as identified by the Secretary); and

`(iv) may incorporate any advance directive (as defined in section 1866(f)(3)) if executed by the individual.

`(B) The level of treatment indicated under subparagraph (A)(ii) may range from an indication for full treatment to an indication to limit some or all or specified interventions. Such indicated levels of treatment may include indications respecting, among other items–

`(i) the intensity of medical intervention if the patient is pulse less, apneic, or has serious cardiac or pulmonary problems;

`(ii) the individual’s desire regarding transfer to a hospital or remaining at the current care setting;

`(iii) the use of antibiotics; and

`(iv) the use of artificially administered nutrition and hydration.’.

(2) PAYMENT- Section 1848(j)(3) of such Act (42 U.S.C. 1395w-4(j)(3)) is amended by inserting `(2)(FF),’ after `(2)(EE),’.

(3) FREQUENCY LIMITATION- Section 1862(a) of such Act (42 U.S.C. 1395y(a)) is amended–

(A) in paragraph (1)–

(i) in subparagraph (N), by striking `and’ at the end;

(ii) in subparagraph (O) by striking the semicolon at the end and inserting `, and’; and

(iii) by adding at the end the following new subparagraph:

`(P) in the case of advance care planning consultations (as defined in section 1861(hhh)(1)), which are performed more frequently than is covered under such section;’; and

(B) in paragraph (7), by striking `or (K)’ and inserting `(K), or (P)’.

(4) EFFECTIVE DATE- The amendments made by this subsection shall apply to consultations furnished on or after January 1, 2011.

(b) Expansion of Physician Quality Reporting Initiative for End of Life Care-

(1) Physician’S QUALITY REPORTING INITIATIVE- Section 1848(k)(2) of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 1395w-4(k)(2)) is amended by adding at the end the following new paragraphs:

`(3) Physician’S QUALITY REPORTING INITIATIVE-

`(A) IN GENERAL- For purposes of reporting data on quality measures for covered professional services furnished during 2011 and any subsequent year, to the extent that measures are available, the Secretary shall include quality measures on end of life care and advanced care planning that have been adopted or endorsed by a consensus-based organization, if appropriate. Such measures shall measure both the creation of and adherence to orders for life-sustaining treatment.

`(B) PROPOSED SET OF MEASURES- The Secretary shall publish in the Federal Register proposed quality measures on end of life care and advanced care planning that the Secretary determines are described in subparagraph (A) and would be appropriate for eligible professionals to use to submit data to the Secretary. The Secretary shall provide for a period of public comment on such set of measures before finalizing such proposed measures.’.

(c) Inclusion of Information in Medicare & You Handbook-

(1) MEDICARE & YOU HANDBOOK-

(A) IN GENERAL- Not later than 1 year after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Health and Human Services shall update the online version of the Medicare & You Handbook to include the following:

(i) An explanation of advance care planning and advance directives, including–

(I) living wills;

(II) durable power of attorney;

(III) orders of life-sustaining treatment; and

(IV) health care proxies.

(ii) A description of Federal and State resources available to assist individuals and their families with advance care planning and advance directives, including–

(I) available State legal service organizations to assist individuals with advance care planning, including those organizations that receive funding pursuant to the Older Americans Act of 1965 (42 U.S.C. 93001 et seq.);

(II) website links or addresses for State-specific advance directive forms; and

(III) any additional information, as determined by the Secretary.

(B) UPDATE OF PAPER AND SUBSEQUENT VERSIONS- The Secretary shall include the information described in subparagraph (A) in all paper and electronic versions of the Medicare & You Handbook that are published on or after the date that is 1 year after the date of the enactment of this Act.

Our research shows that the majority of Americans do not understand advance directives.  85% of those polled have never heard of a Durable Power of Attorney and don’t understand the consequences of not creating one.

Some unanswered questions are:

  • Is the government going to pay for the creation of advance directives forms?   If a doctor and the patient agree on what type of medical treatment they desire, how does the choice get transformed into the correct legal documents?
  • Are doctors opening themselves to malpractice suits if the completion of legal documents is considered giving legal advice?    Some states prohibit anyone but a lawyer from giving legal advice.
  • The implied need is for a centralized database to make end of life consultations work, with common forms and common definitions.  If a doctor and a patient agree on the type of service, how does this information get transmitted to the right people?    Who will pay for creating and maintaining these databases?

It is absolutely critical for people to understand and make choices for end of life planning.   In fact, this is one of the reasons we wrote Die$mart…to make people aware that planning for incapacity is as important as planning for death.

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